For the love of Nooks

Ask   Romancer of the ordinary, collector of curiosities, librarian

liiiiights will guuuuuuide you home. 

liiiiights will guuuuuuide you home. 

(Source: norwegianskull)

— 3 days ago with 87 notes
lifesimpermanence:

"This is a story told to me by my great grandmother. She lived in a time when the wilderness was everywhere, vampires roamed the treetops, and devils traded opium and vodka for human souls by the roadside. My great grandmother lived to be a hundred and ten years of age, and until her dying day could walk a hundred kilometres through the rugged mountain trails near her home village. She knew witches who practised occult alchemy, and with her own eyes witnessed animals take human form. Baba Yaga and the Wolf is a true account from the old days, when the heavens and the underworld existed in closer proximity to the earth than today.”
 
tincanforest.com

lifesimpermanence:

"This is a story told to me by my great grandmother. She lived in a time when the wilderness was everywhere, vampires roamed the treetops, and devils traded opium and vodka for human souls by the roadside.
My great grandmother lived to be a hundred and ten years of age, and until her dying day could walk a hundred kilometres through the rugged mountain trails near her home village. She knew witches who practised occult alchemy, and with her own eyes witnessed animals take human form. Baba Yaga and the Wolf is a true account from the old days, when the heavens and the underworld existed in closer proximity to the earth than today.”

 

tincanforest.com

— 3 days ago with 168 notes
gendrie:

Deathless, Catherynne M Valente

this book is pretty great. “PIES out of their BODIES”. awesome. 

gendrie:

Deathless, Catherynne M Valente

this book is pretty great. “PIES out of their BODIES”. awesome. 

— 3 days ago with 441 notes
"Look, without our stories, without the true nature and reality of who we are as People of Color, nothing about fanboy or fangirl culture would make sense. What I mean by that is: if it wasn’t for race, X-Men doesn’t sense. If it wasn’t for the history of breeding human beings in the New World through chattel slavery, Dune doesn’t make sense. If it wasn’t for the history of colonialism and imperialism, Star Wars doesn’t make sense. If it wasn’t for the extermination of so many Indigenous First Nations, most of what we call science fiction’s contact stories doesn’t make sense. Without us as the secret sauce, none of this works, and it is about time that we understood that we are the Force that holds the Star Wars universe together. We’re the Prime Directive that makes Star Trek possible, yeah. In the Green Lantern Corps, we are the oath. We are all of these things—erased, and yet without us—we are essential."

Junot Díaz, “The Junot Díaz Episode" (18 November 2013) on Fan Bros, a podcast “for geek culture via people of colors” (via kynodontas)

I love that in the wake of the CATWS release, I have been exposed to so many stories in the Marvel fandom of people who came to the movie from experiences of recovery, of rehabilitation, of immigrant experience, of combat disability, of loss. That’s pretty fucking amazing. So when writer’s like Reisman say that it would be BETTER and MORE INTERESTING if superhero characters created tension through their misogyny and homophobia, I feel like that shows an ASTONISHING lack of insight or imagination or like, the basic skills of critical argument. 

(via manticoreimaginary)

— 3 days ago with 14447 notes
#one hundred percent done 

caughtinanocean:

I’m going to have to talk about Natasha first, because apparently all of my meta is about being Russian.

I’ve seen people complaining about it, but Natasha being from the post-Soviet era is fucking brilliant. I don’t care that it’s different from the comics. Obviously, part of the reasoning for this comes from my own lived experience as a Ukrainian immigrant in the United States — I can’t tell you how weary I am of how many Russian women in American media are Cold War-spy eye-candy, and Natasha being removed from that is incredibly important. But it’s not just that. The post-Soviet origin story fits Natasha’s MCU characterization so much better. 

This Natasha watched an empire crumble when she was a child. She was born into a time of decline and economic scarcity — stores with empty shelves and a government struggling to keep it all together, watching republics slip through their fingers. There were endless waiting lists for everything useful — it was a normal part of my childhood that I was not able to call my best friend unless she was at her grandmother’s place. Her building had not yet had phone lines installed. When I’d ask my parents when her apartment was going have a phone, my parents would scoff, “They’re on a list.” 

Read More

— 3 days ago with 2419 notes
"The funny thing is I didn’t grow up with comic books. I grew up with Communism. I was born in Romania and lived there till I was 8 and then I lived in Vienna for a while. Although I was very young, I do remember that we weren’t allowed to leave the country. So after the revolution, people wanted to escape and find a new way of life. It’s that element of being trapped into something—of a lack of freedom. I always thought for me with Bucky, because of how he grew up in the military and his dad dying in an accident on a military base. His last image of Bucky is, “You’re my descendant.” I think there is this enormous amount of weight on him to be something when he’s never had a chance to go, “What do I really want?” I wanted to bring that—I hope that was being translated."

-Sebastian Stan (via sebastianonline)

Shit son. The fucking character work you did still kills me.

(via winterfuckingsoldier)

— 3 days ago with 4752 notes
“But the thought arrived inside her like a train: Marya Morevna, all in black, here and now, was a point at which all the women she had been met—the Yaichkan and the Leningrader and the chyerti maiden; the girl who saw the birds, and the girl who never did—the woman she was and the woman she might have been and the woman she would always be, forever intersecting and colliding, a thousand birds falling from a thousand oaks, over and over.”
— Deathless, Catherynne M Valente

“But the thought arrived inside her like a train: Marya Morevna, all in black, here and now, was a point at which all the women she had been met—the Yaichkan and the Leningrader and the chyerti maiden; the girl who saw the birds, and the girl who never did—the woman she was and the woman she might have been and the woman she would always be, forever intersecting and colliding, a thousand birds falling from a thousand oaks, over and over.”

— Deathless, Catherynne M Valente

— 3 days ago
"Leave the dishes.
Let the celery rot in the bottom drawer of the refrigerator
and an earthen scum harden on the kitchen floor.
Leave the black crumbs in the bottom of the toaster.
Throw the cracked bowl out and don’t patch the cup.
Don’t patch anything. Don’t mend. Buy safety pins.
Don’t even sew on a button.
Let the wind have its way, then the earth
that invades as dust and then the dead
foaming up in gray rolls underneath the couch.
Talk to them. Tell them they are welcome.
Don’t keep all the pieces of the puzzles
or the doll’s tiny shoes in pairs, don’t worry
who uses whose toothbrush or if anything
matches, at all.
Except one word to another. Or a thought.
Pursue the authentic — decide first
what is authentic,
then go after it with all your heart.
Your heart, that place
you don’t even think of cleaning out.
That closet stuffed with savage mementos.
Don’t sort the paper clips from screws from saved baby teeth
or worry if we’re all eating cereal for dinner
again. Don’t answer the telephone, ever,
or weep over anything at all that breaks.
Pink molds will grow within those sealed cartons
in the refrigerator. Accept new forms of life
and talk to the dead
who drift in though the screened windows, who collect
patiently on the tops of food jars and books.
Recycle the mail, don’t read it, don’t read anything
except what destroys
the insulation between yourself and your experience
or what pulls down or what strikes at or what shatters
this ruse you call necessity."

Louise Erdrich, from Original Fire: Advice To Myself (via violentwavesofemotion)

Pursue the authentic, Talk to the dead, don’t read anything except what destroys the insulation between yourself and your experience or what pulls down or what strikes at or what shatters this ruse you call necessity. 

(via commovente)

— 3 days ago with 980 notes
"Laughter is the evidence that we’re still here, the proof that our tragedies will not define us forever. Laughter is the language of the survivor."
Josh Riebock (via namelessin314)

(Source: thequotesymposium, via infatuateur)

— 3 days ago with 7415 notes

Ilana: Dude, I would follow you into hell.
Abbi: I would take you on my shoulders, like, I’d strap you up and I’d be like, “Let’s go through hell”

Captain America 3

(Source: ritaroara, via soyonscruels)

— 3 days ago with 4734 notes
#the parallels are uncanny  #love these two 

so when sebastian stan’s ridiculous 9 picture deal with Marvel is up, someone option him for a Marlon Brando biopic. clearly it is his destiny. 

(Source: stevemcqueened, via heilbucky)

— 4 days ago with 25579 notes
#sad gay boy skills 
"Winter Soldier is even better, taking numerous visual cues from 1970s conspiracy thrillers in service of a story more ambitious than any Marvel has yet told (government overreach as tyranny is a bold statement in a superhero movie at present to say the least), with a cast of heroes who, it must be noted, are mostly women or black – seriously: Cap is the token white guy, and how great is that?"
i mean, yes, but, also: women or black. see what i mean? (x, h/t ultralaser)

Can’t stop. Won’t stop

(Source: isabelthespy)

— 4 days ago with 13 notes